Crate Kings » Producer Interviews » DJ Clark Kent On Blogging, Politics, And Nike Consulting

DJ Clark Kent On Blogging, Politics, And Nike Consulting

November 19, 2008

"Think about the people who are sitting around with all of that time on their hands to get on a computer just to listen to songs instead of having something else to do…"

A pretty tough statement for all of the new artists looking to leverage new promotional tools and fans tired of having mediocre music shoved down their throats by radio and television.  I get the feeling that Clark Kent is forgetting that not everyone has access or even the desire to access traditional outlets.

It’s obvious from Clark Kent’s references to music theft and stealing that he alread holds a negative view of online music distribution and promotion.  However, the fact remains that the music industry is changing and desperately needs to adopt new revenue models.

Part 2 after the jump.

Related posts:

  1. DJ Clark Kent Talks Kicks, Afrika Bambaataa, Jay Z
  2. DJ Clark Kent On The Neptunes’ Production Methods
  3. DJ Clark Kent Pt. 2 – History, Race, Personal Responsibility
  4. DJ Clark Kent On New York Hip-Hop, Producers, And Rappers
  5. DJ Clark Kent – Sole Collector November 2008 Cover

{ 11 comments… read them below or add one }

afroman November 20, 2008 at 2:33 am

“Think about the people who are sitting around with all of that time they’re hands to get on a computer just to listen to songs instead of having something else to do…”

hehe :)

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Wallholder November 20, 2008 at 10:46 am

You can technically steal music from Cassettes and Vinyl.

The fact is that EVERYONE has access to all of the resources available today and it will always come down to whoever embraces the resources and puts them to work.

This video would not have received over a thousands hits/views in 3 days if it wasnt for new technology.

Good post.

Wallholder

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Semantik November 20, 2008 at 12:05 pm

@Wallholder – Agreed… music “theft”, copying, bootlegging, etc was taking place long before mp3s. Sadly, although I have the deepest respect for DJ Clark Kent and his contributions to Hip-Hop, in this particular video he comes across as rather bitter, uninformed, and behind the times.

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jnot@ November 20, 2008 at 1:36 pm

i agree with you semantik. i feel like i wasted my time watching him talk on a topic he isnt all that qualified to speak on. his opinions are his opinions, but i dont see clicking pressing that play button next time he pops up… unless of course its some new music that he produced. with that said, if he reads these replies, he would likely consider us to be “haters” or assume that we have no lives because we took the time to discuss his video.

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benjamino November 20, 2008 at 8:46 pm

While I can not endorse the power of internet marketing and networking enough, I understand Clark’s frustration. What’s missing from music today (especially hip hop) is the grassroots, community element, and that is something the internet can do very little to fix. Personally, I could care less about any musician who isn’t out in the streets doing it: playing shows, selling cd’s, putting up flyers, jamming with his peers. It takes more than a fancy myspace site and a 10,000 hits to be a real musician/artist. Also, stealing is stealing, and there is no way around that one. You can try to justify it all you want, but you will always come up short. If you download music illegally, you might as well put a candy bar in your pocket the next time you go to the gas station, because a thief is a thief. I sound like my Dad right now, but the truth is not always pleasing. Someone worked hard to make that song, and invested hours and money in a studio to create it, and a record company spent countless hours preparing to market and distribute it….you think its ok to just take that? Everyone has kids to feed.

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Cai November 21, 2008 at 12:44 pm

it’s like listening to some old unhappy guy in part 1…but one day I’m going to be old God Willing…

But dude doesn’t realize Lupe Fiasco buzz came from the internet…

Jeezy got a lot of buzz off the internet also…

Clark Kent isn’t the all knowing but none of us are…

But I respect what he’s done for the game and his sneaker game…

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G-Money November 21, 2008 at 5:48 pm

HAHAHAAHAH! Did this dude say JOE BUDDENS one of the best rappers!!!! Hahahahahahaahhaha, im about to shit myself! This dude obviously hasnt been out much! Maybe homie should lay off the blogs! hahahahahahah WOW…lmao….silly…I think ive lost all respect for dude.

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G-Money November 21, 2008 at 5:49 pm

HAHAHAAHAH! Did this dude say JOE BUDDENS one of the best rappers!!!! Hahahahahahaahhaha, im about to shit myself! This dude obviously hasnt been out much! Maybe homie should lay off the blogs! hahahahahahah WOW…lmao….silly…I think ive lost all respect for dude. And I immediatley turned this shit off!

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mrfloyd November 22, 2008 at 12:43 pm

Blogs are INCREDIBLE. The way we can share info and network is unbelievable.
I learn so much from communicating with people on sites like cratekings.

You want money???
Sell only vinyl records. Fuck CD’s and MP3′s. Force the consumers back to the vinyl medium.
Also…Music makers are art PERFORMERS. Need to hit the road, show em what ya got.

Records and Shows.

Need to push for viny pressing ONLY releases.

Lets bring it back yo!!

Clark Kent is hating. And obviously checking’ out the blogs.

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Semantik November 26, 2008 at 4:45 pm

@benjamino
Let me preface this by saying this is not an attack.  I agree wholeheartedly that artists should be fully and fairly compensated (one of the reasons we won’t post music unless specifically requested by the artist or label), but will have to disagree with your statement that "stealing is stealing." There’s a lot of gray area that has yet to be clearly defined and just because the RIAA and MPAA declare that certain actions constitute stealing does not necessarily make that the case.

While sharing or downloading files may be illegal in many circumstances, that certainly does not assure that current laws or the arguably unconstitutional practices of the RIAA are appropriate. For many people it goes beyond the argument of paying for music. Record labels have repeatedly failed to provide value to an increasingly savvy customer base that demands respect for its time, intelligence, and purchasing power.  They have simply refused to adapt to the demands of the marketplace and instead have chosen to blame customers for its own failures.

Times have simply changed… I won’t get too deep into the topic since others have done a much better job, but remember there was a point in history when the powers that be fought against other technological innovations and information distribution methods such as printed books, cassettes, and VHS.

I also can’t stress how much I disagree with the candy bar comparison. Music is no longer strictly distributed by physical means and the protection of intellectual property vs physical goods are two very different concepts.

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Considerate International November 28, 2008 at 3:52 am

Clozed Eyz Droppin in Dec. http://www.myspace.com/clozedeyz1

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